Using the SliceScope Pro 2000 for in vitro electrophysiology experiments

Using the SliceScope Pro 2000 for in vitro electrophysiology experiments


The SliceScope Pro 2000 is a full electrophysiology rig including a SliceScope upright microscope, motorised XY translation stage, two PatchStar micromanipulators and a SlicePlatform.

The incredibly stable platform will hold your sample steady as you explore the tissue with the microscope. Enabling the maintenance of patch clamp recordings while you look for other healthy cells to experiment on.

Two sliding carriages are also supplied to enable perfect positioning of your manipulators and thanks to its large size, the platform can accommodate additional manipulators for more complex studies.

Below are five examples of researchers using the SliceScope Pro 2000 to enable delicate electrophysiology studies and investigate a range of scientific questions.

Scientifica SliceScope Pro 2000

A complete electrophysiology rig with a large, stable platform. Ideal for delicate in vitro electrophysiology experiments and dual patch clamp recordings.

Gene responsible for Kleefstra syndrome mediates synaptic scaling

Researchers from the Donders Institute at Radboud University in the Netherlands have shown how a gene called Euchromatic Histone Methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1), regulates the bandwidth at which neurons exchange information.

The inability to stay within these bands can lead to the intellectual disability known as Kleefstra syndrome.

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P2X receptors mediate AMPA receptor function in hippocampal neurons

ATP activated postsynaptic P2X receptors (P2XRs) have been shown to decrease the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and AMPA-evoked currents in hippocampal neurons, in a paper published in the journal Neuron. This can happen through activation of P2XRs by exogenous ATP or noradrenaline-dependent glial release of endogenous ATP.

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Finely tuned: Dynamically tweaking interneurons on-the-go

Scientists have identified a new molecular ‘switch’ that controls the properties of neurons in response to changes in the activity of their neural network.

The research, published in Science, shows that neurons can be tuned dynamically, throughout their lifetime. A finding that could have implications for areas as far apart as education policy and new therapies for neurological conditions like epilepsy.

Tune-up your brain

Temporal coding modulates visual processing in retinal bipolar cells

Researchers in the US have discovered that ON cone bipolar cells assist image processing by using temporal coding to tune the way each subtype responds to light stimuli.

They identified 6 subtypes of bipolar cells by looking at their morphology, in particular their terminal ramification patterns, in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the retina. These were subtype 5s, 5f, 6, 7, 8 and XBC ON cone bipolar cells.

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Which way? How is positive and negative information delivered from the amygdala?

A recent paper from MIT reveals how two populations of neurons within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) carry information about pleasant or unpleasant experiences through divergent pathways.

Learning more about these pathways and how they route or misroute information could help us better understand mental illnesses like depression, addiction, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder.

Positive or negative?

Scientifica SliceScope Pro 2000

A complete electrophysiology rig with a large, stable platform. Ideal for delicate in vitro electrophysiology experiments and dual patch clamp recordings. Add extra manipulators to conduct more complex network studies.

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