Watch on-demand: Multiphoton imaging with next-generation indicators webinar

The HyperScope multiphoton imaging system now has advanced imaging capabilities; the introduction of an extended wavelength lens set means you can image deeper and through thin scattering layers in in vivo samples. Learn more here.

Watch on-demand: Multiphoton imaging with next-generation indicators webinar


On Wednesday 30th June, Scientifica hosted its first webinar 'Multiphoton imaging with next-generation indicators' in partnership with the British Neuroscience Association (BNA) and Chromacity.

The webinar saw Dr Christian Wilms present an introduction to Scientifica and the flexible HyperScope multiphoton imaging system, followed by Chromacity's Dr Christopher Leburn present the benefits of the Chromacity 1040 laser for two-photon imaging.

Keynote speaker, Dr Manuel Mohr, then discussed the development of next-generation indicators, including jYCaMP, which can be efficiently excited by fibre lasers. Manuel explained how these ultra-sensitive indicators have opened up new experimental avenues, and the possibilities future indicators could bring.

The webinar ended with an engaging discussion between the panellists, answering the excellent questions asked by attendees. Watch the recording below to find out more about these exciting new indicators and whether using a fibre laser for two-photon imaging could work for you.

About Dr Manuel Mohr

Manuel obtained a Bachelor in Biotechnology from Technical University Munich in his home country Germany before moving to Switzerland to pursue a Master in Biotechnology and Systems Biology at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich.

His thesis work in the labs of Daniel Müller and Botond Roska focused on designing viral tools for mechanically targeted viral infection (“viral stamping”) and sparked his interest in neuroscience and fluorescence imaging.

Driven by this fascination he pursued his PhD studies in Periklis Pantazis’ lab at ETH Zurich, where he focused on novel processes in photoconvertible fluorescent proteins. Being awarded the Janelia Graduate Research Fellowship allowed Manuel to move his research to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research Campus, where he worked with Eric Schreiter and Loren Looger towards improving fluorescent indicators for neural activity, combining his love for imaging and biomolecular engineering with another passion: neuroscience.

Currently, Manuel is a postdoc in Prof. Xiaoke Chen’s lab at Stanford University, where he continues to engineer novel tools of broad use to the neuroscience community while also collaborating with imaging experts at UC Berkeley, using next generation multi-photon imaging techniques to unravel functional architecture in the mouse spinal cord

Take a look at out other webinar recordings

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